rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
Today we bring you a finned octopus, Cirroteuthis muelleri, seen in the Arctic in 2005. These octopods are technically known as cirrates, but they are sometimes called “dumbos” because their large fins make them look like flying cartoon elephants flapping their ears. They are among the largest organisms of the deep sea, with species seen in the Canada Basin can grow to 1.5 meters in length. Learn more about these critters: Ocean Explorer - Arctic - 2005 Or check out more octopus pics: OE Octopus Pics

rhamphotheca:

Today we bring you a finned octopus, Cirroteuthis muelleri, seen in the Arctic in 2005. These octopods are technically known as cirrates, but they are sometimes called “dumbos” because their large fins make them look like flying cartoon elephants flapping their ears. They are among the largest organisms of the deep sea, with species seen in the Canada Basin can grow to 1.5 meters in length.

Learn more about these critters: Ocean Explorer - Arctic - 2005

Or check out more octopus pics: OE Octopus Pics

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms
by Mary Bates
Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.
Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.
They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.
1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms

by Mary Bates

Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.

Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.

They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.

1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.